Landscape

Kids’ Needs
Increase Across
The State

Landscape

More School Districts Serve Low‑Income Students

In recent years, far greater numbers of Illinois school districts are teaching students who are living in poverty. In 43% of school districts in 2015, more than half of the students are coming from low-income homes, up from 13% in 2005. Research shows that it costs more to educate low-income students, many of whom start school academically behind their more affluent peers.4 These students may need, for example, help to build vocabulary and background knowledge, extra learning time, or links to other services, such as healthcare, to meet the full range of their needs.5

Source: Illinois School Report Card

2005
  • 0-20%
  • 20-40%
  • 40-60%
  • 60-80%
  • 80-100%
  • NO DATA
2010
  • 0-20%
  • 20-40%
  • 40-60%
  • 60-80%
  • 80-100%
  • NO DATA
2015
  • 0-20%
  • 20-40%
  • 40-60%
  • 60-80%
  • 80-100%
  • NO DATA
  • 0-20%
  • 20-40%
  • 40-60%
  • 60-80%
  • 80-100%
  • NO DATA
Landscape

More School Districts Serve Students Learning English

Students learning English are now over 10% of the total Illinois public school population and live all over the state. Schools that never served English learners in the past are now realizing they must adjust to meet changing needs, as students learn English and a full array of traditional subjects.

Source: Illinois School Report Card

2005
  • 0%
  • 0-5%
  • 5-10%
  • 10-15%
  • 15+%
  • NO DATA
2010
  • 0%
  • 0-5%
  • 5-10%
  • 10-15%
  • 15+%
  • NO DATA
2015
  • 0%
  • 0-5%
  • 5-10%
  • 10-15%
  • 15+%
  • NO DATA
  • 0%
  • 0-5%
  • 5-10%
  • 10-15%
  • 15+%
  • NO DATA
Landscape

Race & Poverty in Illinois

Landscape

Inequitable K-12 Funding Shortchanges the State’s Neediest Students

More than half of Illinois state education dollars go to districts regardless of their wealth, shortchanging poor districts that have students with greater needs. For every dollar Illinois spends on a non-low-income student, the state spends only 81 cents on a low-income student. The existing funding system fails to provide adequate funding to address the social, emotional and physical needs of low-income students, English learners and students with special needs. Because of inequitable funding, students in low-income and majority African American and Latino districts are too often faced with larger class sizes, fewer special classes like art and music, outdated textbooks and increased student activity fees, when they need the opposite.

After a nearly year-long budget impasse, the General Assembly passed a stopgap budget in late June 2016 that ensured that schools would open on time in Fall 2016. However, structural reform is still needed. At the time of this writing, the Governor’s School Funding Reform Commission is in discussions to fix the structural issues of Illinois’ notoriously inequitable state education funding formula. This longstanding inequity demands change when the General Assembly returns in Spring 2017.

FOR EVERY $1 SPENT ON A NON-LOW-INCOME STUDENT,
OHIO SPENDS $1.22 on A low-income student.
ILLINOIS SPENDS $0.81.

Source: The Education Trust

Landscape

Low-Income Students, Especially Those of Color, Lose Most Under Our Current Funding System

Community Spotlight
Rolling Meadows

“I want to change my students’ lives,” says Marilyn Gutierrez, an aspiring teacher now in her senior year at Rolling Meadows High School in Chicago’s northwest suburbs. “I see it as a privilege to be bilingual and be able to connect with students.”

With a 4.0 GPA and a 21 on her ACT, Gutierrez precisely fits the hardest demographic to recruit into the Illinois teacher workforce: high-achieving students of color. This year, Gutierrez is part of a cadre of 20 seniors who have committed to teaching and intend to return to the local area’s schools.

Their district, District 214, has partnered with National-Louis and Northeastern Illinois universities to offer low-cost, no-debt college financing and is working with partner elementary districts to guarantee student teaching placement, professional development and hiring interviews to the prospective teachers as they proceed to and through college. “As a community, there’s a seven- to eight-year investment being made in these students,” says Dan Weidner, director of career and technical education for District 214.

For many students like Gutierrez, who would be the first in their families to attend college, affordability and proximity to family are often key considerations, notes Weidner. And coming back to District 214 or its partner elementary districts as teachers can be an economic boost to entire families. Based on salary and working conditions, “these are destination districts,” he observes. “If they get hired back in our area, it’s very possible they will be earning multiples more of their entire family income.”

Interested high school students can explore teaching through a four-course education pathway, which includes a dual-credit capstone teaching experience for seniors, called Education Academy. To be eligible for the college and postsecondary incentives, students will have to take Education Academy plus at least one earlier course in the pathway.

Gutierrez is in the first of four practicum rotations she’ll experience through Education Academy, supporting a class of 2nd graders at Kimball Hill Elementary School. Later this year her practica will focus on English learners, students with special needs and middle-schoolers.

Already, Gutierrez is putting her language skills to work. “I have a student who just came here recently from Mexico. He’s been struggling in the English [literacy instruction] block,” she says. “I’ve been able to translate for him and help him practice.”

Though the initial cohort of seniors is small, Weidner says about 900 younger high school students across the district are currently exploring the educator career pathway. While District 214 has long had an outstanding career sequence for aspiring early childhood educators, over the last two years the district has strengthened its offerings for potential K-12 educators and sharpened its focus on encouraging talented minority students to consider teaching as a career. “I want our pathway to become a grow-your-own effort within our community, also focusing on interested minority students,” says Weidner. “We want to bring them back to our own districts.”

Numbers

Early Education K-12 Postsecondary
2016 2014 2016 2014 2016 2013
1A Public schools 2,087 2,187 3,672 3,729
1B Public charter schools 63 65
1C Private schools 10,453 10,572 1,788 1,796
1D Public school districts 855 863
1E Community colleges 48 48
1F Public universities 12 12
1G Private not-for-profit universities 90 83
1H Private for-profit universities 27 26

1. Number of schools in the state: Private early education sites include licensed and licensed exempt childcare centers and licensed family-run centers. Postsecondary institutions include those that do not grant associate's or bachelor's degrees. Sources: Early Ed- IECAM, Administration for Children and Families: 2014, 2012; Head Start Program Information Report (PIR): 2014, 2012. K-12- ISBE State Report Card: 2016, 2015, 2014; Illinois Network of Charter Schools: 2016, 2014, via email. Postsecondary – IBHE Databook: Fall 2015, Fall 2012.

Enrollment

Early Education K-12 Postsecondary
2015 2013 2016 2014 2016 2013
2A State-funded preschool 75,154 75,623
2B Federally-funded preschool 42,178 44,175
2C State-funded home-visiting 14,207
2D Federally-funded home-visiting 3,962 3,931
2E Private preschool 312,512 303,697
2F Public Schools 1,977,667 1,987,069
2G Public charter schools 64,112 59,788
2015 2013 2016 2013
2H Private schools 228,475 241,080
2I Community colleges 278,562 264,654
2J Public universities 143,616 148,467
2K Private not-for-profit universities 131,492 129,735
2L Private for-profit universities 52,861 53,403

2. Enrollment. Sources: Early Ed- IECAM, Administration for Children and Families: 2014, 2012; Head Start Program Information Report (PIR): 2014, 2012. K-12- ISBE State Report Card: 2016, 2015, 2014. Postsecondary – IBHE Databook: Fall 2015, Fall 2012.

Enrollment Demographics

Early Childhood Postsecondary
Head Start PFA K-12 Community College Public University Private NFP Private FP
2015 2013 2015 2013 2016 2014 2016 2013 2016 2013 2016 2013 2016 2013
3A White 30% 26% 38% 42% 49% 50% 56% 59% 54% 59% 56% 59% 42% 41%
3B Black 42% 41% 23% 20% 17% 18% 13% 14% 14% 16% 9% 10% 25% 25%
3C Asian 2% 1% 3% 4% 5% 5% 4% 8% 9% 4% 7% 7% 4% 3%
3D Latino 31% 35% 31% 30% 26% 25% 20% 11% 13% 14% 15% 13% 12% 13%
3E Not Latino* 69% 65%
2015 2013 2015 2013 2015 2013 2015 2013
3F Low Income** 72% 75% 63% 50% 52% 32% 33% 38% 38% 34% 35% 61% 68%
3G English Language Learner 25% 29% 23% 16% 11% 10%
3H Special Education 10% 10% 16% 23% 14% 14%

3. Sources: Early Ed- IECAM, Administration for Children and Families: 2014, 2012; Head Start Program Information Report (PIR): 2014, 2012. K-12- ISBE State Report Card: 2016, 2015, 2014. Postsecondary – IBHE Databook: Fall 2015, Fall 2012.

Funding***

Early Childhood Postsecondary
Head Start PFA K-12 Community College Public University 2-year Private 4-yr Private NFP 4-yr Private FP
2015 2013 2015 2013 2014 2012 2014 2012 2014 2012 2014 2012 2014 2012 2014 2012
4A Total government funding $7,615 $7,175 $3,161 $3,245 $14,756 $14,510
4B State & local funding $13,639 $13,301 $9,326 $8,017 $9,301 $8,961 $449 $472 $619 $495 $89 $251
4C Local funding $8,222 $8,253
4D State funding $5,417 $5,048
4E Federal funding $1,117 $1,209 $2,900 $3,087 $6,024 $6,678 $1,882 $2,707 $5,135 $5,648 $435 $812
5 Tuition paid per pupil $2,701 $2,636 $10,781 $11,085 $14,727 $14,414 $21,541 $20,901 $22,843 $23,036
6 Instructional expenditure per pupil $7,822 $7,327 $6,421 $5,574 $16,262 $14,906 $5,628 $5,205 $19,298 $17,690 $3,764 $3,768
7 Total expenditure per pupil $7,615 $7,175 $3,161 $3,245 $13,077 $12,389 $15,364 $14,023 $50,170 $46,089 $16,001 $17,175 $61,143 $56,681 $18,803 $20,783

4. Government funding per pupil: Monetary values from past years adjusted for inflation. Postsecondary - Funding per FTE student. Amount includes direct funding to institutions. When determining FTE enrollment, part-time students count as a fraction of a student. Sources: Early Ed- NIEER, The State of Preschool Yearbook: 2015, 2013, 2005 (values adjusted for inflation). K-12- U.S. Census Bureau, Public Education Finances Report: 2014, 2012. Postsecondary- IPEDS: 2014, 2012.

5. Tuition paid per pupil: Postsecondary- Tuition paid per FTE pupil (does not include tuition covered by financial aid). Source: IPEDS: 2014, 2012.

6. Instructional expenditure per pupil: Monetary values from past years adjusted for inflation. K-12- Instructional expenditures include salaries, wages, and employee benefits. Postsecondary- Instructional expenditures include general academic instruction, vocational instruction, community education, and adult basic education. Expenditures that are primarily administrative are excluded. Postsecondary values reflect spending per FTE pupil. Sources: Early Ed- Data Unavailable. K-12- U.S. Census Bureau, Public Education Finances Report: 2014, 2012. Postsecondary: IPEDS: 2014, 2012.

7. Total expenditure per pupil: Expenditures from previous years adjusted for inflation. K-12- Includes instructional expenditures along with administrative costs, instructional staff support, and pupil support. Postsecondary- Includes both instructional and administrative expenditures. Spending per FTE pupil. Sources: Early Ed- NIEER, The State of Preschool: 2015, 2013, 2005. K-12- U.S. Census Bureau, Public Education Finances Report: 2014, 2012. Postsecondary- IPEDS: 2014, 2012.

Are Illinois educators effective?

Black Leading State Leading State's Performance IL Rank Latino Leading State Leading States's Performance IL Rank
32A PK-12 teacher diversity compared to student population 65% 8 out of 15 CA 97% 26% 9 out of 15 FL 62%
32B Postsecondary teacher diversity compared to student population 50% 4 out of 15 PA 76% 34% 12 out of 15 OH 71%
Historical Performance Equity
2014 2012 2009 2004 Leading State Leading State's Performance IL Rank Rank Change White Black Latino Low-Income
33 Teachers demonstrating effectiveness
42A K-8 students per counselor 1 : 1,445 1 : 1,497 1 : 1,421 1 : 1,405 NH 1 : 277 42nd 2
42B High school students per counselor 1 : 315 1 : 320 1 : 294 1 : 298 WY 1 : 96 43rd 2

Are Students In An Environment That Supports Learning?

Historical Performance Equity
2016 2015 2014 2006 Leading State Leading State's Performance IL Rank Rank Change White Black Latino Low-Income
34 Minimum instructional hours 880 880 880 880 MD; TN 1170 42; 44
35 5Essentials: Involved Families 37% 32% 40%
36 5Essentials: Supportive Environment 31% 30% 30%
37 5Essentials: Effective Leaders 26% 23% 33%
38 5Essentials: Collaborative Teachers 34% 34% 30%
39 5Essentials: Ambitious Instruction 63% 59% 41%
39B % of schools with at least 3 strong areas on the 5Essentials 38% 34% 35%
40 Teacher retention rate 86% 85% 86%
43 Chronic truancy 10% 9% 9% 2%****
2014 2012 2009 2004
41A K-12 suspension rate of white boys 5% 5%
41B K-12 suspension rate of black boys 19% 18%
41C K-12 suspension rate of latino boys 7% 8%
41D K-12 suspension rate of white girls 2% 2%
41E K-12 suspension rate of black girls 13% 11%
41F K-12 suspension rate of latino girls 4% 3%

Source identifies race and ethnicity separately.

Low-income is defined as 100% FPL for Headstart, 185% FPL for PFA and K-12, and Pell grant eligibility for postsecondary.

Inflation adjusted to most recent year.

Definition of Truancy changed in 2010.

Resources

For more information, including a snapshot of every school in Illinois, visit the Illinois School Report Card.