Recent News

Statement on ISBE’s Solutions to Address State’s Teacher Shortage Crisis

Sept. 13, 2018

The Teachers for Illinois’ Future Coalition supports ISBE’s proposed recommendations to end the state’s teacher shortage crisis, as stated in their “Teach Illinois: Strong Teachers, Strong Classrooms” report. The recommendations align with our coalition’s core principles which we use to evaluate proposals.

Our principles are as follows:

1. Ensure students have the teachers they need in order to learn.
2. Support teachers’ growth from exploration of profession and throughout their career.
3. Increase the respect for and the desirability of the teaching profession.
4. Provide school and program leaders with systemic flexibility to meet their students’ needs.

We think action on these recommendations will make progress toward eliminating the state’s current teacher shortage crisis. We are pleased to see ISBE’s emphasis on working with partners to achieve these changes. We look forward to future conversations on the specifics of the strategies, how the recommendations will be prioritized, systematically implemented, and equitably and adequately funded.
We appreciate ISBE’s thorough analysis and thoughtful recommendations brought forward in the “Teach Illinois” report. We urge the State Board to continue to bring together experts and advocates from across the state to ensure a comprehensive and integrated solution is developed.

Signatories to the Statement:
Advance Illinois
Association of Illinois Rural and Small Schools
Center for the Study of Education Policy at Illinois State University
Council of Chicago Area Deans of Education
Equity First Superintendents
Faith Coalition for the Common Good
Illinois Association of Regional Superintendents of Schools
League of United Latin American Citizens
Northern Illinois University
Roosevelt University
Stand for Children Illinois
Teach Plus Illinois

About Teachers for Illinois’ Future
Teachers for Illinois’ Future is a coalition made up of diverse education experts and advocates who work to ensure all students, especially those who need the most, have access to the teachers they need to prepare them for college and career.

Postcard from Singapore: Elevating teaching in a well-funded, aligned system

By Jim O’Connor
Project Director
Advance Illinois

Full funding. Alignment from the early grades through career. An elevated and modernized teaching profession. These are all aspects of the education system in Singapore, where I visited late last year with a group from Teach For All’s Education Policy Community of Practice. While there, we met with teachers, agency leadership, and even futurists who work for the Prime Minister’s Office whose job it is to advise political leadership on the needs of the future workforce and economy based on current trends (see their latest report here—page 40).

Advance Illinois’ Jim O’Connor in Singapore, where he visited late last year.

Since Singapore began participating in the Program for International Student Assessment (PISA) in 2006, it has consistently ranked in the top 5 countries for reading, math, and science. [1] However, they are the first to note the advantages that they have as a country. With 5.6 million residents in an area barely larger than the City of Chicago, Singapore is relatively small and compact. [2] It has had the same political party in power for 53 years, which has led to a level of policy stability.

Come with me to Singapore for five observations about its education system.

Singapore supports school systems with sustained, adequate funding levels.  Education has been one of the top three governmental expenses in Singapore for at least the past 15 years, demonstrating a consistent commitment to adequately funding the education system. [3] In comparison, where Singapore dedicates 17% of its spending to education, only 2% of the U.S. federal budget goes to education. [4]

Singapore prioritizes regular school review, curricular reform, and support for teachers in times of transition. Every six years, the School Appraisal Branch of the Ministry of Education (MOE) conducts an external review of all schools in the country to identify areas for improvement.[5] Following each review cycle, the MOE creates stakeholder committees of agency and school representatives, who accordingly design, test, and gather feedback from schools on proposed new curricula. Rather than rushing reform, teachers are also informed of curricula changes over two years before full implementation. This in-depth and regular review for school improvement, involvement of diverse stakeholders, and careful implementation of policy over time serves students well.

Singapore tightly aligns collaboration between different education agencies. The MOE, National Institute of Education (NIE) for teacher training and schools have a strong collaborative relationship that improves efficacy and quality. The ministry develops policy, and the NIE conducts research and provides pre-service training to educators.[6] When asked about Singapore’s strengths, researchers at the NIE point to fact that no education policy is announced without a plan for building the capacity to meet it. [7] The tightly shared responsibility and accountability between the MOE, NIE, and schools allow Singapore to carry out reform initiatives that effectively reach both schools and teacher preparation programs.

Singapore works hard to attract, select, train, and grow teacher talent. The MOE advertises teaching on a variety of platforms to ‘sell’ the profession as an attractive career. Tuition for teaching candidates is completely free. If a candidate commits to teaching for at least three years, they also receive a stipend equivalent to 60% of a teacher salary while in training. The many individuals attracted to teaching then undergo the highly selective entry process to attend the NIE, the nation’s only teaching college. Successful teacher candidates must be in the top third of their secondary school graduating class, pass a literacy test, and demonstrate evidence of interest in education and serving diverse student bodies, communication skills and the potential to be a good role model.  Finally, the NIE only accepts candidates for areas where there is a need.  For the most recent year, they decreased the number of math and science entrants according to decreased need. Imagine that!

Singapore invests heavily in teacher development. Teaching candidates spend 22 weeks of their training as student teachers practicing in front of K-12 students alongside a master teacher. Early-career teachers then receive two years of induction support while teaching only 80% of an experienced teacher’s load. Throughout their careers, Singapore teachers receive 100 hours off for professional learning each year and can access funding for study leave. As teachers become more experienced, they can advance their careers in established teaching, leadership, or specialist tracks that allow them to personally develop and improve the system with their expertise.

We can look to other countries like Singapore for both inspiration and ideas on how to move forward to create a system – from recruitment, to preparation, to teacher learning to career advancement – that complements and supports its different parts.  The result will be a highly capable teaching staff who deliver effective instruction each day.

Jim O’Connor wrote about his recent Teach for All experience in Finland in a previous postcard.

[1] OECD 2006 participating countries: http://www.oecd.org/pisa/pisaproducts/39725224.pdf

OECD 2009 rankings: https://www.oecd.org/pisa/pisaproducts/46619703.pdf

OECD 2012 rankings: https://www.oecd.org/pisa/keyfindings/pisa-2012-results-overview.pdf

OECD 2015 rankings: https://www.oecd.org/pisa/pisa-2015-results-in-focus.pdf

[2] The City of Chicago is 234 square miles: https://www.cityofchicago.org/city/en/about/facts.html

Singapore is 721 square km, or 278 square miles: https://data.gov.sg/dataset/total-land-area-of-singapore

[3] See “Summary Tables of Revenue & Expenditure Estimates” from https://www.singaporebudget.gov.sg/, 2003-15

[4] CBPP, “Policy Basics: Where do our Federal Dollars Go?”, https://www.cbpp.org/research/federal-budget/policy-basics-where-do-our-federal-tax-dollars-go

[5] OECD, “Singapore: Rapid Improvement Followed by Strong Performance”https://www.oecd.org/countries/singapore/46581101.pdf

[6] https://www.oecd.org/countries/singapore/46581101.pdf

[7] https://www.oecd.org/countries/singapore/46581101.pdf

Statement on the Release of Preliminary School Discipline Data

The following is a joint stakeholder statement on the Illinois State Board of Education’s release of preliminary school discipline data.

July 19, 2018

Yesterday, the Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) took another step towards understanding our students’ learning environment with the release of preliminary data on school discipline, i.e. expulsions and suspensions. Now that the Illinois Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) plan has been adopted, we have an opportunity to analyze new data that will help us understand and improve the climate and culture of all schools across our state.

While we know school discipline is one component in understanding school climate and culture, we are hopeful that the data will help illustrate the need for increased supports for schools, rather than to punish schools or school leaders. We look forward to deepening our understanding of the methodology and underlying trends including how different districts are being added to the list. We now have work to do to understand how districts are being added to this list as well as the increasing and decreasing trends of suspensions and expulsions within districts across the state.

Our organizations are committed to working in partnership with ISBE to ensure that school discipline data as well as any other data used for school improvement is grounded in the diverse needs of our school districts. Districts are constantly in a space of trying to prioritize between counselors and teachers as well as many more resources needed for students’ success. We urge our legislature to fully fund the evidence-based model so schools won’t have to make those tough decisions. Together, we can strive to take a proactive, comprehensive approach in keeping kids where they should be– in school.

Stakeholder comments:

“This is just the first step in understanding all of the data available to us related to school climate and culture. We look forward to digging deeper into this data and collaborating with school districts and other advocates to make improvements to Illinois’ education system.” –Raul Botello, Co-Executive Director, Communities United

“We recognize the complexities at play in this data. There is more work to be done in understanding this information and how we can continue to strive for ideal learning environments for our students. It will take continued state investment in schools to ensure we have the supports for students that can help them to excel.” –Dr. Sharon Kherat, Superintendent, Peoria School District 150

Signatories to the Statement

Advance Illinois
Communities United
Educators for Excellence
Equity First Superintendents
Teach Plus Illinois
Voices of Youth in Chicago Education
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Postcard from Helsinki: Understanding teaching in a high-performing system 

By Jim O’Connor
Project Director
Advance Illinois 

Advance Illinois’ Jim O’Connor during his trip to Helsinki, Finland, as part of Teach for All.

Over the last year, I was honored to be part of Teach for All’s Global Community of Practice in Education Policy.  As part of this community, we traveled to and learned from schools and education leaders in Finland, which is known for its high-performing schools and is widely regarded as having a high-quality teaching force. I was interested in understanding the key elements of their system. Here’s what I learned.  

Aspects of Finnish teacher preparation 

More than a generation ago, teacher training took place at three- to four-year teacher training colleges. Finland later centralized teacher training sites in 11 universities distributed across the country. The new system required five to six years, resulted in a Master’s degree for all teachers. There are now just eight universities charged with preparing the nation’s 1,000 teaching candidates annually, which are highly selective spots.

Admission into teaching programs 

Using one university as an example, 1,006 candidates took the test to enter the program. This entrance exam includes a multiple-choice test and an essay response to multiple education articles. The interview stage then assesses the 300 top scoring candidates and only 122 of the candidates were accepted into the program. At one of the top universities in Finland, the University of Helsinki, the teacher education program had an admissions rate of 6.8% and was harder to get into than their law school (8.3%) or their medical school (7.3%).2  One of the senior regional education leaders remarked that he was lucky to get into a teaching program, “I don’t know who I fooled to get into a Special Education teacher training program—they are the most competitive.”  

Practice makes permanent  

The Finnish education system provides teaching candidates extended practice time with students alongside cooperating teachers. Finnish teaching candidates teach for six to seven weeks in each of their last three years of their program. They also practice with master teachers in a lab school designed for the purposes of teaching students and training and developing teachers.  

Access to well-designed textbooks   

Finland has a national curriculum with a defined sequence of knowledge and skills that children ought to be taught at each grade. There is a common usage of high-quality textbooks. In her book about the world’s highest-performing education systems called Cleverlands, author Lucy Crehan, a fellow alumnus of Teach for All, notes that, “In Finnish schools, the textbook is the main tool. Experienced and skillful teachers have come together with the publisher to create an interesting, enjoyable and motivating textbook.”  While teachers report a high level of autonomy, there is much consistency in the types of lessons and the materials used.   

Reflections  

Our trek into the Finnish system pushed my thinking regarding teacher preparation and teacher quality, and what constitutes effective teaching.  I asked multiple school leaders what they believed is the cause of Finland’s strong educational outcomes. Extensive teacher training, a high bar for entry into the profession, intensive practice, high-quality materials and autonomy are among the answers.

Another Sterling example of education-workforce collaboration

Editor’s note: Gail Wright, College and Career Readiness Coordinator at the Regional Office of Education #47, which serves Lee, Ogle and Whiteside Counties, wrote to provide us an update on Workplace Wednesdays. The initiative is another in the burgeoning MORE (Making Opportunities Real for Everyone in the Rock and Mississippi River Valleys) regional effort to ensure that students are ready for life after high school (we wrote about a another nearby effort in our postcard from Sterling two weeks ago about our 10th anniversary Listening Tour). Workplace Wednesdays bring teachers into postsecondary institutions and area workplaces to consider real-world application of their teaching.

Teachers tour industrial equipment manufacturer Astec Mobile Screens as part of Workplace Wednesdays.

“Educators visited two to four businesses each Wednesday over a seven-week period this summer.  The visits focused on Agricultural, Manufacturing, Health and Human Services career pathways, a bank and the Whiteside Area Vocational Center and area post secondary institutions (Sauk Valley Community College and Morrison Tech) available to our students making that Pre-K through 20 linkage. Our teachers learned about the programs and certificates their students could earn in the career pathways to prepare students for jobs in the businesses visited.

“It has been a real success based on the feedback from the teachers participating and businesses, who indicated they would like to participate in Workplace Wednesdays next summer. Our teachers participating have come up with a list of places they would like to visit next year and bring some friends from their schools. This will help to provide more change in those schools, having more teachers see the need for integrating real-world workplace skills and content (math and English, speaking and listening) and using Career Cruising and Inspire [software that connects kids to workplaces]. They have made contacts with businesses to take their students on field trips to see the practical application of what they are learning as well as the classroom activities and problems. The visits have helped us increase the numbers of businesses in Inspire as well as awareness of the need for collaboration between classroom teachers and businesses.”

Postcard from Sterling: Closing the gap between the education system and employers

Editor’s note: This is the second in a series as Advance Illinois travels the state during its 10th anniversary year. Read the previous installment of the series, from North Chicago, here.

By Bob Dolgan
Communications Director
Advance Illinois 

Jake Knapp was just out of high school when he started his job assembling hair clippers and trimmers at Wahl Clipper Corporation in Sterling. Eighteen years later, he is returning to school and gaining critical new skills thanks to an apprenticeship program through his employer.   

Jake Knapp

“I had thought about going back to school,” said Knapp, a 37-year-old Rock Falls resident. “But once you’re out of that phase and have a family and a fulltime job, it’s hard to do that.” 

Advance Illinois visited 30 Illinois communities in the past several months as part of a Listening Tour to inform our 10th anniversary agenda and to chronicle the pressing education issues facing the state. In talking to more than 400 people and collecting at least 1,400 data points, we heard repeatedly that there are jobs available in the state but that there are too few qualified candidates to fill them. The reasons for the gap range from a lack of math skills to a lack of technical skills and soft skills. Wahl Clipper, a growing company that employs close to 1,200, has about 60 openings for assembly line operators, machinists and more—fulltime jobs with benefits. 

“We have good jobs, well-paying jobs, and can’t get quality candidates to fill them,” said Deana Jones, who oversees manufacturing hiring at Wahl Clipper. “We expect basic computer knowledge coming into the door. It’s not people being mindless robots by any stretch of the imagination.” 

Wahl Clipper headquarters in Sterling

When we visited Sterling, in the scenic and vibrant Sauk Valley region, we heard about a number of efforts under way to improve coordination among business, community and education partners. One of them is Making Opportunities Real for Everyone (MORE) in the Rock and Mississippi Valley Regions, part of the Illinois 60 by 25 Network, which includes Advance Illinois as a network organizer. And employers like Wahl are taking steps to grow their own talent, too. Wahl Clipper has had an open tool-and-die job for almost two years. That’s where the apprenticeship program comes in, which covers education costs and enables employees to take time out of their work day for classes. Knapp’s story inspired one of the many themes in Advance Illinois’ new 10-year agenda, which will be formally announced at a luncheon on Dec. 3. 

“It is really a two-pronged approach, in getting the skill level in the classroom and the hands-on day-to-day work in the tool room,” Jones said. “We’re bringing guys in here, giving them an education so they can get a journeyman’s card that will be portable.” 

Knapp is taking courses at Sauk Valley Community College and is on track to fill a higher-paying and more technical tool-and-die job in the next three years. Wahl’s program and efforts like MORE could help to close the gap between Illinois’ business sector and its education system.  

“I love my job now,” said Knapp, father to a 14-year-old daughter. “I used to dread coming in day to day. Now I’m coming in doing something different every day, and it’s actually fun.” 

Contact Bob Dolgan at bdolgan@advanceillinois.org or 312-734-1446. 

Teaching Summit a day of learning and creating

Nearly 100 teachers, advocates and policymakers came together on June 2 in Oak Park for the Elevate Teaching Summit: Ensuring an Effective Education in Every Illinois Classroom. The Summit was aimed at informing Teach Illinois, a year of inquiry into the teaching profession launched by the Illinois State Board of Education. The event was presented by Advance Illinois and the Joyce Foundation.

We now have a full recap of the event, available here. In addition, Stephanie Banchero of the Joyce Foundation was inspired to write the following op-ed for the Chicago Tribune.

Contact Jim O’Connor, Project Director, at 312-235-4537 or joconnor@advanceillinois.org, for more information about Advance Illinois’ work toward ensuring an effective educator in every Illinois classroom.

 

Recap: Professional Review Panel for new school funding model meets for first time

By Maryam Bledsoe
Policy Intern
Advance Illinois

On June 26, the Evidence-Based Funding Professional Review Panel (PRP) met for the first time to discuss its focus and direction. The panel, created by SB1947, a bill adopted in August 2017 that changed the way Illinois funds its public schools will continually review the new funding system to ensure it is staying true to its intent of allocating more resources to the students who need it the most.

The PRP, made up of school and district administrators, educators, parents, PTA representatives, and experts in education from across Illinois, will meet quarterly. Representatives from the Funding Illinois’ Future coalition and Fund the Formula campaign are members of this panel as well, including: Dr. Carmen Ayala, Superintendent, Berwyn North School District; Bill Curtin, Educator, Carbondale Community High School; Dr. Nakia Hall, Board Member, Crete-Monee School District 201-U; Jessica Handy, Government Affairs Director, Stand for Children Illinois; Ralph Martire, Executive Director, Center for Tax and Budget Accountability; Brian Minsker, President, Illinois PTA; and Gary Tipsord, Superintendent, LeRoy CUSD.

The first meeting took place at the Illinois State Board of Education in Springfield. State Superintendent Tony Smith conveyed that the main goal of the PRP is to complete a study of the entire Evidence Based Funding (EBF) model, assessing whether it is meeting adequacy targets set for each district within five years of implementation. The vast majority of districts in Illinois remain well below adequate funding levels. In addition, the PRP will review and recommend changes to EBF in one-, three-, and five-year periods.

During the meeting, members appointed Dr. Michelle Mangan of Concordia University the PRP chair and Susan Griffin, President of the Illinois Association of School Business Officials, the co-chair. The panel established four subcommittees on topics including: early childhood, equity issues tied to race, regional safe schools and college and career readiness.

The agenda, a full list of members, and the presentation used to review the EBF model can all be found here. The next meeting of the PRP will be Sept. 18 at 10 a.m.

Media alert: Elevate Teaching Summit Brings Together National, State Leaders for Dialogue on Teaching

June 2, 2018

WHO: More than 100 teachers, principals, advocates and policymakers will come together for a Summit aimed at informing Teach Illinois, a year of inquiry into the teaching profession launched by the Illinois State Board of Education. The event is presented by Advance Illinois and The Joyce Foundation. Speakers include: Ricky Castro (Illinois State Teacher of the Year 2017), Jason Helfer (Deputy Superintendent, Illinois State Board of Education), Lillian Lowery (VP, PreK-12 Policy, Research and Practice, The Education Trust), Audrey Soglin (Executive Director, Illinois Education Association), Julie Stephenson (Talent Pipeline Lead and University Liaison, Lincoln Parish Schools (Louisiana)), Matt Zediker (Chief Human Resources Officer, Rockford Public Schools).

WHAT: Speakers will address equity and teacher diversity from a national perspective, including efforts under way in Illinois and Louisiana to attract more teachers, and innovative career pathway models, such as those in Rockford Public Schools and District 214 (serving the Northwest Suburbs of Chicago.) Following the speaking program, participants will break into small group discussions on topics related to the teaching profession and policy. We plan to share the ideas generated during the event with the Illinois State Board of Education’s Teach Illinois effort. The state board is working to create a set of policy goals that will help address teacher shortages, while also elevating and modernizing the profession.

WHEN: Saturday, June 2, 10 a.m.-1 p.m.

WHERE: Irving Elementary School, 1125 Cuyler Ave., Oak Park, IL 60304

WHY: An effective teacher is the No. 1 predictor of student success in the classroom. However, Illinois is experiencing teacher shortages in some regions of the state and in specific subject areas. A recent survey from the Illinois State Board of Education reveals that communities of color and low-income school districts are most likely to see teacher shortages. Of the 1,006 unfilled teacher positions in the state, 74% are in majority-minority school districts while 81% are in districts where the majority of students are low-income. Over half of the state’s unfilled teacher positions are in bilingual and Special Education. Measures in this session of the General Assembly will ease access for out-of-state teachers, expand the pool of available substitute teachers and lengthen the number of days that retired teachers may work. However, more action is needed to ensure an effective educator is in every Illinois classroom.

Contact: Bob Dolgan, bdolgan@advanceillinois.org, 773-447-1980 cell

For more information on Advance Illinois, visit www.advanceillinois.org
For more information on The Joyce Foundation, visit www.joycefdn.org

League of United Latin American Citizens honors Dr. Teresa Ramos

Caroline Sanchez Crozier, left, and Dr. Teresa Ramos at the LULAC Annual State Convention.

Dr. Teresa Ramos, Director of Community Engagement for Advance Illinois, received the Latinx Advocate Leadership Award from the League of United Latin American Citizens (LULAC) at the 62nd Illinois LULAC Annual State Convention on Saturday, June 9, at Argo Community High School in Summit.

Teresa was honored for her leadership of the Funding Illinois’ Future coalition, which successfully advocated for a fix to Illinois’ worst-in-the-nation school funding formula in 2017.

“She’s a young Latinx leader inspiring people across Illinois,” said Caroline Sanchez Crozier, Founding President, LULAC Illinois Education Council 5238. “Her amazing energy was needed to tackle a 20-year problem. My advocacy work of today was inspired by her dedication for education equity. Her work embodies the mission of LULAC.”

Teresa spent five years working to build the coalition, taking innumerable trips across the state and culminating with a final flurry of 40-plus town hall meetings in 2017.

The convention honored other education advocates, too. Juan Salgado, Chancellor, City Colleges of Chicago, and Advance Illinois Board Member, received the LULAC Latinx Higher Education Leadership Award. State Sen. Andy Manar received the LULAC Legislator Leadership Award, and Dr. Carmen Ayala, Superintendent, Berwyn North School District, received the LULAC Latinx K-12 Leadership Education Award. Jesse Ruiz, Partner, Drinker, Briddle & Reath LLP, received the LULAC Scholarship Alumni Legacy Award. Keynote speakers included Maria Socorro Pesqueira, President, Healthy Communities Foundation, and Eric B. Lugo, Executive Vice-Chancellor for Institutional Advancement of City Colleges of Chicago.